Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Oregon Man Charged For First-Degree Murder, Orders Assassination of His Wife in Dark Web

Stephen Carl Allwine from Cottage Grove, Oregon, who previously made contacts in the Dark Web to plot an assassination of his wife, was indicted by a Washington County grand jury for premeditated first-degree murder.

On March 24, the Washington County District Court officially increased the potential sentence of Allwine from second-degree to first-degree murder, considering the newly acquired pieces of evidence submitted by state prosecutors. One of the newly uncovered evidence was the drug level of the body of Amy Allwine when it was found late last year. Investigators discovered that Amy took a dosage of scopolamine which was 45 times higher than the recommended level.

Investigators also found bitcoin transactions on Allwine’s computer that were sent to a darknet drug marketplace to purchase scopolamine. Since Amy didn’t have a prescription for the drug, investigators are suspected that Allwine bought the drug on the darknet purposely to overdose his wife before murdering her in their home.

According to the investigators, it seems as if Allwine had a local bitcoin wallet running in his computer and his mobile phones but avoided using web-based wallet. Thus, when the investigators obtained a warrant to raid his house, they were able to find traces of his bitcoin transactions that linked to bitcoin darknet marketplaces that sold drugs illicitly.

Previously, DeepDotWeb reported that Carl Allwine was arrested on February 19 again after he was let go on bail on January 31. One of the conditions which the court specified on his bail in January was that Allwine is not allowed to contact or communicate with his son indefinitely, until the entire case concludes.
However, Allwine attempted to track down his son using the GPS system within his son’s smartwatch. Since Allwine possessed sophisticated computer systems and applications, he was ultimately able to find his son’s location.

Allwine was immediately arrested by local police and was placed in a trial led by Judge Mary Hannon. During the trial, Hannon increased the bail by US$100,000, raising the bail to $600,000, and demanded Allwine to never contact his son and the family of Amy again.

In his trial last week, District Judge B. William Ekstrum increased the bail once again as Allwine was charged for first-degree murder by the Washington County District Court. Judge Ekstrum set the bail at $2 million without any conditions and offered a $1 million conditional bail to Allwine.

When the court finally decided to elevate the charge of Allwine from second-degree to first-degree murder and increase his bail, Washington County Attorney Pete Orput stated that the family of Amy and himself are trusting in the grand jury process and pursue necessary legal proceedings in a transparent and just manner.

“We have great faith in the grand jury process and those people serving on the grand jury exercising their civic responsibility,” said Orput.

As of now, local publications are unsure if Allwine accepted the conditional bail of $1 million offered by Judge Ekstrum. However, state prosecutors and attorneys including Orput are confident that the newly uncovered pieces of evidences including the transaction history of Allwine’s bitcoin wallet and the drug level of Amy’s body will be sufficient to prove Allwine guilty of his charge.
In January, Twin Cities reported:

“Authorities later connected Stephen Allwine to dogdaygod by a 35-character bitcoin address used on one of Allwine’s smartphones. Allwine’s smartphones also helped authorities confirm an affair he had with a woman he met on Ashley Madison, a website for those seeking extramarital affairs. The romance lasted a few months before fizzling in February.”

In the upcoming weeks, investigators plan to focus on unraveling the identity of darknet marketplace operator dogdaygod and connecting Allwine’s bitcoin addresses to darknet purchases.